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Reflections of a working writer and reader

 

 

Her Silence is Mine. Her Eyes Mine.

Chagall often depicted himself as a donkey

Chagall often depicted himself as a donkey

‘If I have made pictures, it is because I remember my mother, her breasts so warmly nourishing and exalting me, and I feel I could swing from the moon,’ Chagall said at 79.

His young, illiterate, adoring mother, to whom Chagall was extremely close until her death in 1915, gave him robustness and optimism, but also a vulnerability in the form of his extreme dependence on women.

The Telegraph site has Jackie Wullschlager, the author of a new book on Marc Chagall, with an examination of the way the women in his life influenced his art.

5 Responses to “Her Silence is Mine. Her Eyes Mine.”

  1. tali2 says:

    I love that painting. With some paintings, the way you view them changes as you learn more about the history behind them. This is one of them. You can sense Chegall’s sensitivity in this. The woman in the painting is delicate — one man hovers over her, protecting her like a halo, and the rest of the muted world in her acts in her background as if to bring her on purpose to the foreground, though she is already there inherently.

    I watched Notting Hill over the weekend, so my first thought upon seeing your entry was Julia Roberts talking about the violin-playing goat. 🙂

    jb says: Thanks for the comment, tali2. I wonder how many others Julia Roberts has led to Chagall?

  2. It is great to read your views about Marc Chagall. I am trying to set up a blog at the moment about him, feel free to contribute if you have the time. When i get to La Mariee i shall link back to this interesting post.

    jb says: Thanks, Tom. An interesting site you have there; I’ll have to spend some more time there soon.

  3. david miller says:

    I love Chagall! I remember seeing an amazing chagall show in the 70’s in Jerusalem – it waas probably the definite Chagall show of all time. He must have loved his wife so much it just comes across so striongly in his paintings

  4. Mark Dinars says:

    Who is the painter of that painting showed above?

    Mark Dinars